Resources

Here are free Save Our Citrus outreach resources that you can take, use, personalize with your logo/contact info, and distribute far and wide to help prevent the spread of citrus diseases.


Practice Safe Citrus


The United States government and the citrus industry have taken steps to stop the spread of citrus diseases, including quarantines of affected areas, inspection of host plants, removal of infected plants, confiscation of illegally shipped plants, USDA certification of citrus and public education campaigns. Here is what you can do to practice safe citrus:

Everyone:

  • Know the facts about citrus diseases
  • Get the word out: tell others about citrus diseases
  • If you suspect citrus is being moved improperly, report your concerns to USDA’s Smuggling Interdiction and Trade Compliance toll-free hotline at (800) 877-3835

Citrus Buyers:

  • Don’t move citrus plants or plant materials out of quarantined states or territories including Alabama, American Somoa, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Texas and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
  • Be a savvy buyer. Gift citrus fruit sold in a regulated state must be packed in a certified packinghouse and accompanied by a USDA certificate. Commercial fruit packers, Internet shippers and roadside vendors within regulated states should be able to prove they are in compliance with the federal quarantine. Before you buy, ask the vendor if their product is in compliance.
  • Be aware that if you knowingly purchase citrus in violation of quarantine regulations and requirements, the penalties you could incur range from $1,100 to $60,000 per violation.

Citrus Owners and Homegrowers:

  • Inspect citrus plants regularly for disease and insects
  • If you detect an infected plant, report it immediately
  • Enjoy your fruit with friends and neighbors, but be sure to obtain a federal certificate if you transport your citrus outside of your state. To inquire about transporting your citrus out of state, contact your USDA State Plant Health Director’s office.

Gift Citrus Smart


Before you give citrus, there are four things you should know to gift smart:

  1. Be Aware of Quarantines. If you are thinking about giving citrus fruit, plants, or items made with citrus (such as floral arrangements, wreaths, potpourri or seasonings like kaffir lime leaves) be sure not to move them from quarantined states or territories. Not only are you risking spreading citrus diseases by transporting citrus outside of these areas, but it’s also against the law. Learn more about quarantines.
  2. Check the Citrus Supplier. Be a savvy buyer. Gift citrus fruit sold in a regulated state must be packed in a certified packinghouse and accompanied by a USDA certificate. Commercial fruit packers, Internet shippers and roadside vendors within regulated states should be able to prove they are in compliance with the federal quarantine. Before you buy, ask the vendor if their product is in compliance. Learn more about quarantines.
  3. Keep Homegrown Citrus at Home. Help reduce the spread of citrus diseases by not moving your homegrown citrus fruit or plants across state lines. Enjoy your fruit with friends and neighbors, but be sure to obtain a federal certificate if you’re thinking of transporting your citrus outside of your state. To inquire about transporting your citrus out of state, contact your USDA State Plant Health Director’s office.
  4. Avoid Fines and Penalties. Because citrus diseases have destroyed millions of acres of citrus around the world, they present an immediate and urgent threat to America. If you knowingly purchase citrus in violation of quarantine regulations and requirements, the penalties you could incur range from $1,100 to $60,000 per violation. If you suspect citrus is being moved improperly, report your concerns to USDA’s Smuggling Interdiction and Trade Compliance toll-free hotline at (800) 877-3835.

GROW CITRUS SMART


When you buy and grow citrus, there are five things you should know:

  1. Be Aware of Quarantines. Be aware of the quarantines in your state. Do not move citrus trees, fruit or trimmings from these areas. Not only are you risking spreading citrus diseases by transporting citrus outside of these areas, but it’s also against the law. Learn more about quarantines.
  2. Inspect Citrus Plants Regularly for Diseases and Insects. Visit our Citrus Diseases page to identify a plant infected by citrus greening, citrus canker, citrus black spot and sweet orange scab. If you detect an infected plant, report it immediately.
  3. Keep Homegrown Citrus at Home. Help reduce the spread of citrus diseases by not moving your homegrown citrus fruit or plants from quarantine areas or across state lines. Enjoy your fruit with friends and neighbors, but be sure to obtain a federal certificate if you’re thinking of transporting your citrus outside of your state. To inquire about transporting your citrus out of state, contact your USDA State Plant Health Director’s office.
  4. Check the Citrus Plant Supplier. Be a savvy buyer. Citrus plants sold in a regulated state must be sold from a certified vendor and be accompanied by a USDA certificate. Commercial fruit packers, internet shippers and roadside vendors within regulated states should be able to prove they are in compliance with the federal quarantine. Before you buy, ask the vendor if their product is in compliance. Learn more about quarantines. If you buy a plant that is disease-free, you’ll have a much healthier, more productive tree.
  5. Avoid Fines and Penalties. Because citrus diseases have destroyed millions of acres of citrus around the world, they present an immediate and urgent threat to America. If you knowingly purchase citrus in violation of quarantine regulations and requirements, the penalties you could incur range from $1,100 to $60,000 per violation. If you suspect citrus is being moved improperly, report your concerns to USDA’s Smuggling Interdiction and Trade Compliance toll-free hotline at (800) 877-3835.

Quarantine Information

National

Check out related maps for:
Citrus Greening
Sweet Orange Scab

Alabama

Entire state is under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (334) 358-4920.

Arizona

The entire state is under quarantine for sweet orange scab. A portion of LaPaz, Mohave, and Yuma Counties are under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (602) 431-3200.

Citrus Greening map

California

Portions of Los Angeles and Orange counties are under temporary state emergency quarantine for citrus greening disease. State and federal officials are conducting a comprehensive survey of the region to identify the extent of potential disease spread. California residents may call 800-491-1899 for general information on the state regulations.

All of Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Riverside and Ventura counties, as well as parts of Tulare, Fresno, and Kern counties are under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (916) 930-5500.

Citrus Greening map

Florida

Entire state is under quarantine for citrus greening disease, Asian citrus psyllid, citrus canker and sweet orange scab. A relatively small area of southwest Florida in adjoining areas of Hendry and Collier counties is under quarantine for citrus black spot.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at ( 352) 313-3040 or Florida’s Citrus Health Response Program hotline at 1-800-282-5153, which is maintained by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Citrus Black Spot map 1
Citrus Black Spot map 2

Georgia

Entire state is under quarantine for citrus greening disease and Asian citrus psyllid.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (770) 860-4020.

Guam

Entire island is under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at 808-838-2780.

Hawaii

All islands are under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at 808-838-2780.

Louisiana

Two parishes are under quarantine for citrus greening disease. The entire state is under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid and sweet orange scab.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (225) 298-5410.

Mississippi

Entire state is under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid and sweet orange scab.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (662) 323-1291.

Puerto Rico

Entire Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is under quarantine for citrus greening disease and Asian citrus psyllid.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts, contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (787) 771-3611 or the Puerto Rico Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine Division, at (787) 724-4627.

South Carolina

Beaufort, Charleston and Colleton counties are under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid.

In addition, Beaufort and Charleston counties are under quarantine for citrus greening.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (919) 855-7600.

Texas

Entire state is under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid and sweet orange scab. A portion of Hidalgo County is under temporary state emergency quarantine for citrus greening disease. State and federal officials are conducting a comprehensive survey of the region to identify the extent of potential disease spread.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (512) 916-5241.

Citrus Greening map

U.S. Virgin Islands

U.S. Virgin Islands is under quarantine for citrus greening disease and Asian citrus psyllid.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at (787) 766-6050.

American Samoa

The entire Territory is under quarantine for Asian citrus psyllid.

For regulatory information regarding the movement of fresh citrus fruit, citrus nursery stock or other citrus parts (cut foliage, seeds, wood, etc.), contact the USDA State Plant Health Director’s office at 808-838-2780.


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